Course Descriptions

Not all courses may be offered in a specific term.

All Course Offerings

AP/GER 1000 6.0 Elementary German

PREREQUISITE: None; no previous knowledge of German is assumed.

DESCRIPTION: Students learn the basic elements of German grammar through an active and participatory approach that should enable them, by the end of the course, to communicate in German in everyday situations. Reading and writing skills are developed parallel to oral and listening skills. Audio visual and culturally related materials provide opportunity for students to expand their understanding of the cultural implications of the language. Note: Supplemental interactive exercises are available in the Multimedia Language Centre (S117 Ross) for language practice in addition to classroom instruction.

FORMAT: Four class hours per week.

AP/GER 1790 9.0 Nationalism, Authority and Resistance: Perspectives on German Culture and Society

(Crosslisted to: AP/HUMA 1190 9.0)

Germany might exemplify the problems, conflicts, and possibilities of the modern world better than any other single state. It has careened from an open democracy to brutal dictatorship, been united, divided, and united again in a little over 100 years, embraced the rational optimism of the Enlightenment and the racism of Nazi Germany culminating in the Holocaust. This course examines cultural representations of contemporary and historical Germany from an interdisciplinary perspective. Examining cultural, political and social discourses, we will consider the tensions that have characterized "Germany" historically and in the present day through the lens of texts that include e.g. literature, film, art, journalistic and political writing. Particular attention will be paid to: Nationalism and multiculturalism, authority and resistance, competing visions of democracy or freedom, religion and rationalism, the role of Germany in Europe and the world, and the effect of the past on contemporary German society. Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course: Humanities Course credit exclusions: AP/GER 2790 9.0 (prior to Fall 2014), AP/HUMA 2190 9.0 (prior to Fall 2014). PRIOR TO FALL 2009: Course credit exclusions: AS/GER 2790 9.0, AS/HUMA 2190 9.0.

Language of Instruction: English

AP/GER 1791 6.0 The Fairy Tale: From Grimm To Disney

Pervasive in most cultures across the globe, fairy tales thrive because of their universal nature. Fairy tales are more than just children literature. They encapsulate in (usually) succinct form many of the most pressing concerns of human existence: family conflict, the struggle for survival, sexual desire, the quest for happiness, among many others. Published about 200 years ago, Brothers Grimms Fairy Tales remains one of the most iconic pieces of literature and has had significant influence on modern pop culture. This course examines fairy tales in the context of their longevity, their origins, and their ever changing roles in media and popular culture. Note: This is an approved LA&PS General Education course: Humanities

Language of Instruction: English

AP/GER 2000 6.0 Intermediate German

PREREQUISITE: AS/GER 1000 6.0, University Preparation Level 4 High School or OAC German, or an equivalent background in German.

DESCRIPTION: In addition to a review of basic grammatical structures, students learn and use, in appropriate contexts, more advanced grammatical structures and idioms. The course uses an approach in which all language skills (speaking, listening, reading and writing) are further developed with the goal of functioning effectively in various German-speaking situations. Students are expected to attend the Multimedia Language Centre (South 117 Ross Building) to use various audio-visual materials, computer programmes and the Internet to assist in the process of language acquisition and cross-cultural literacy.

FORMAT: Four class hours per week.

AP/GER 2790 9.0 Germany Through the Ages: Culture and Society

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 2190 9.0)

PREREQUISITE: This course is offered entirely in English; no knowledge of German is required or assumed. The course is a required course for the German Studies degree program (both streams).

DESCRIPTION: In the heart of the "New Europe" lies a "New Germany," united in 1990 after almost a half-century of division. In attempting to answer the question as to how new and how united this new Germany is, events, movements, and personalities are examined which throughout German history have shaped German culture and society. Texts are taken from a variety of fields such as literature, journalism, political science, sociology, history, music, cinema and other visual arts. Topics discussed include: Germany and other German speaking countries, medieval heritage, religion, nationalism, resistance to authority, every day life under National Socialism and Socialism, minorities, Germany's role in today's Europe, and finally, an intercultural reflection of Canadian views of Germany.

FORMAT: Two hours lecture and two hours tutorial. The course is team-taught. Some guest lectures, as well as showing of some films/videos in class, as appropriate.

Note: Successful completion of this course fulfills General Education requirements in the Faculty of Liberal Arts & Professional Studies.

AP/GER 3001 3.0 Advanced Level German, Level IA

PREREQUISITE: AP/GER 2000 6.0 or equivalent. Departmental Course Entry Authorization slip required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

DESCRIPTION: This course will build upon and expand the students' knowledge of the German language and culture. It will focus on the development of a wider range of vocabulary, more complex grammatical structures and on pronunciation. Emphasis will be put on the exploration of authentic and up-to-date German language materials and on the discussion of current cultural issues.

Note: Upon completion of this course, the majority of the students should have sufficient background to sit for a language proficiency examination. For students not majoring in German, the Certificate of Proficiency in German Language, offered by the Department, should be of interest.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3002 3.0 Advanced Level German, Level IB

PREREQUISITE: AP/GER 3001 3.0 or equivalent. Departmental Course Entry Authorization slip required PRIOR TO ENROLMENT.

DESCRIPTION: This course will build upon and expand the students' knowledge of the German language and culture. It will focus on the development of a wider range of vocabulary, more complex grammatical structures and on pronunciation. Emphasis will be put on the exploration of authentic and up-to-date German language materials and on the discussion of current cultural issues.

Note: Upon completion of this course, the majority of the students should have sufficient background to sit for a language proficiency examination. For students not majoring in German, the Certificate of Proficiency in German Language, offered by the Department, should be of interest.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3200 6.0 Modern and Contemporary German Writers

(Cross-listed with AP/EN 3461 6.0 and taught with AP/GER 4200 6.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

Note: The course does not count for German major/minor credit in the German Studies (Language, Literature and Culture) stream. However, this course (or AP/GER 4200 6.0) is a required course for students pursuing a major or minor in the German Studies (Culture and Society) stream.

DEGREE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/GER 4200 6.0

DESCRIPTION: This course aims to familiarize students with some of the major German-language writers and works of the 20th and 21st centuries. Writers may include Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Georg Simmel, Irmgard Keun, Bertolt Brecht, Stefan Zweig, Walter Benjamin, Günter Grass, Ingeborg Bachmann, Christa Wolf, Bernhard Schlink and W.G. Sebald. We will apply various theoretical and critical approaches in order to establish the historical, sociological and cultural conditions under which these texts were produced and to discuss the particular pressures and concerns to which they represent a response.

Topics may include: modernism and modernity; gendered urban spaces; war and social disorder; post-war reflections on National Socialism; history, memory and representation; Germany divided/Germany reunified; migration and transnational/multilingual identities. Other media such as film, music and visual arts may also be considered.

FORMAT: Two hours of lecture and discussion and one hour of tutorial.

AP/GER 3600 3.0 Berlin in German Literature and Culture

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3600 3.0)

Instructor: Christina Kraenzle

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: In the last century, Berlin has undergone changes and upheavals more radical than those experienced by virtually any other great metropolis. During the first three decades of the 20th century, it was a world centre of modernism. It then served as the capital of Hitler's Third Reich. After World War II, Berlin became a microcosm of the Cold War. The fall of the Berlin Wall and the unification of Germany began a new and challenging era for Berlin, now the capital of a "New Germany."

This course highlights the following periods in the story of modern Berlin: the making of a metropolis; Weimar; Hitler and the aftermath; the Cold War; and reunification. In particular, it will consider Berlin's rich cultural history and the artists, filmmakers, writers, architects, intellectuals and other cultural agents who influenced, and were influenced by, the developments of modern Berlin.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3601 3.0 Vienna in the Early 20th Century: Literature, Art, Culture and Politics

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3601 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: A major centre of European modernism, Vienna was home to some of the 20th century's most influential artists and thinkers: Freud, Wittgenstein, Klimt, Schnitzler, Hofmannsthal, Strauss. This interdisciplinary course investigates Viennese intellectual and cultural production in the period of radical socio-political change that marked the final years of the Habsburg Monarchy. Students will consider how a variety of works from philosophy, literature, psychology, music, art and architecture were shaped by and reflect the historical, political and social contexts of fin-de-siècle Vienna.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3640 3.0 Women in German Literature and Culture

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3602 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the rich cultural history of women writers, filmmakers and artists from German-speaking Europe, their roles and identities, and the formation of gender-specific national and intercultural models in literary works and other forms of cultural representation.

We will encounter Europe's first female playwright, the winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize for Literature, and one of the 21st century's brightest young literary stars. We will apply various theoretical and critical approaches, ranging from feminist theory, feminist or other literary criticism and social and literary history, in order to establish the historical, sociological and cultural conditions under which these texts were produced and to discuss the particular pressures and concerns to which they represent a response.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3750 3.0 Inventing the Museum: Collecting, Culture and Modernity

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: The course investigates how the 19th-century's creation of the public museum reinvents the story of civilization, profoundly altering concepts of memory, art, politics, history and identity. It approaches these issues in the European context, using architecture, art history, politics, history, philosophy and literature from the French Revolution to the present. The course offers theoretical perspectives by Foucault, Adorno, Benjamin, and Malraux; major literary texts by the likes of Goethe, Balzac, Stifter, Flaubert, Rilke, and Sebald; and art and architecture by figures such as Schinkel, Rodin, and Gehry. The course will additionally introduce methods for using primary sources in research and examine the notion of museum studies as a paradigm for contemporary interdisciplinary approaches to culture.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/GER 4750 3.0

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3751 3.0 Utopias and Nightmares: Visions of the Future in Modern German Culture

(Taught with AP/GER 4751 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course examines a selection of German films and texts that serve as vehicles for assessing the current state of the world and alternatives to it. The course will examine literary and cinematic mediations of science and technology in shaping those alternatives. The course uses a cultural studies approach and further develops students' understanding of different modes of representation and text production, and of the relationship between e.g. popular, scientific, and ethical discourses on cultural production.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3791 3.0 Early German Cinema

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3980 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course considers the medium of film as a cultural product which mediates and contributes to discourses on national and cultural identity. We will study film texts that were produced from the beginning of the 20th century to 1961. The films selected for analysis are representative of important developments within German cinema and include both 'canonical' and commercially successful films. Adopting a chronological approach, we will trace continuities and shifts of cinematic practices from the Wilhelmine cinema before WWI to the cinema of the Weimar Republic, the Nazi period and to post-war cinema in West and East Germany. All films and readings will be discussed in relation to developments within German society and to international trends of the periods in question. Students will identify common themes, motifs, master narratives and discuss developments against the background of dominant aesthetic positions at the time of the films' production and reception.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term. Students will be required to set aside some additional time to view films in the film library on an individual basis.

AP/GER 3792 3.0 Recent German Film and Culture

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3985 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course aims to familiarize students with major German directors from East, West and post-Wall German cinema. Films will be chosen to reflect the historical, political and cultural situation of contemporary German society. Topics for discussion may include: coming to terms with the Nazi past, history and representation, multicultural Germany, (im)migration and transnational identities, Germany divided/Germany reunified, gender and sexual identity.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term. Students will be required to set aside some additional time to view films in the film library on an individual basis.

AP/GER 3793 3.0 Screening the Past: Rewriting German History in Film

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3986)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course will look at the medium of film as a cultural product which contributes to the shaping of national/collective identities by its representation of history. We will look at film texts which were produced in the Weimar Republic, in West and East Germany, and in post-unification Germany during the 20th and at the beginning of the 21st century.

Our analyses and discussions will focus on the different approaches to the reconstruction of history within the context of political, social, and cultural developments. We will structure our discussion around major themes such as nostalgia, cultural heritage, autobiography and discuss issues of 'collective memory', 'reality', 'realism', 'representation', and 'authenticity' against the background of dominant aesthetic positions at the time of the films' production and reception.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3794 3.0 Family Fictions: Narrating the Family in German Cinema

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3983 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: In the cinema, almost all conventional narrative texts relate to some extent to the social sphere of family life and reflect on the role of the family as a site of gender construction, the socialization of children, and the formation of social hierarchies. This course will examine popular and 'canonical' German-language films and explore ways in which these texts construct the social unit of the family. Our analysis of the cinematic (de)construction of the 'ideal family' in a variety of films will illuminate ideological struggles and further students' understanding of the connections between social mechanisms, political processes and cultural production. We will examine film examples taken from different genres (among them Heimatfilm, comedy, road movie, thriller, rubble film) and from different periods of German cinematic history.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term. Students are expected to view the films in their own time in the library (SMIL) in preparation for class discussion.

AP/GER 3820 3.0 Germany in Transit: Nation, Migration and Cultural Production

(Taught with AP/GER 3820 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course considers how concepts of national community and belonging based on ancestral lineage and cultural heritage have been challenged in the wake of increased migration. Using Germany as a case study, we will explore how contemporary artists are exploring issues of national and cultural identity, citizenship and minority rights. We will also consider the aesthetic practices they employ to inscribe novel configurations of place, language and identity. Our discussions and analyses will touch on major topics such as mobility and identity; gender and migration, language and identity; place and belonging; racism and xenophobia. We will consider a variety of media including film and visual arts, literature and music.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3840 3.0 German Romanticism: Tradition and Revolution

(Cross-listed with AP/EN 3460 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: German Romanticism (c. 1796-1830) produced radical and innovative works that profoundly influenced German and European culture. Searching for new forms of expression in the aftermath of the French Revolution, the Romantics embraced new impulses from music, the visual arts, philosophy, mathematics, and the natural sciences, initiating developments that anticipate the modernity of the 20th and 21st centuries.

In this course we will explore the seminal ideas of Friedrich Schlegel, Novalis, and Wackenroder, and read popular stories of Tieck, Fouqué, Chamisso, and Brentano as well as the fairy tales of women writers such as Günderrode and Bettina von Arnim, and those of the Brothers Grimm; we will examine Romantic tropes such as madness, the quest, the uncanny and the subject as hero and/or antihero, and explore painting, music, architecture, philosophy, as well as literature.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 3989 6.0 Germany and the Global Imaginary

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 3989 6.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

Note: This course is a required course for students pursuing a major or minor in the German Studies program (both streams).

DESCRIPTION: This course aims to familiarize students with major trends in contemporary, transnational German Studies through the analysis of key moments that have informed German self-imagination and the imagination of other cultures. It considers how other nations' engagement with Germany has influenced German self-definition. Through the examination of select intellectual, artistic, and social engagements with various parts of the world, the course aims to challenge simple national paradigms of 'Germanness' and to highlight cross-border contacts and exchanges that have helped to shape Germany's history.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week.

AP/GER 4001 3.0 Advanced German, Level IIA

Review of aspects of grammar and idiomatic expressions; introduction to the principles and practice of essay writing; oral reports on assigned readings on current affairs, with an emphasis of vocabulary building. Prerequisite: AP/GER 3000 6.0, or permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: None. Prior TO FALL 2009:Prerequisite: AS/GER 3000 6.0 or AS/GER 2040 6.0, or permission of the department. Course credit exclusions: AS/GER 3040 6.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003), AS/GER 3043 3.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003) or AS/GER 4000 6.0 (prior to Fall/Winter 2002-2003) and AS/GER 4001 3.0.

Language of Instruction: German

AP/GER 4200 6.0 Modern and Contemporary German Writers

(Taught with AP/GER 3200 6.0)

PREREQUISITE: AP/GER 3002 3.0, or permission by the Department.

Note: This course is a required course for students pursuing a major or minor in the German Studies (Language, Literature and Culture) stream.

DESCRIPTION: This course aims to familiarize students with some of the major German-language writers and works of the 20th and 21st centuries. Writers may include Friedrich Nietzsche, Sigmund Freud, Thomas Mann, Franz Kafka, Georg Simmel, Irmgard Keun, Bertolt Brecht, Stefan Zweig, Walter Benjamin, Günter Grass, Ingeborg Bachmann, Christa Wolf, Bernhard Schlink and W.G. Sebald.

We will apply various theoretical and critical approaches in order to establish the historical, sociological and cultural conditions under which these texts were produced and to discuss the particular pressures and concerns to which they represent a response.

Topics may include: modernism and modernity; gendered urban spaces; war and social disorder; post-war reflections on National Socialism; history, memory and representation; Germany divided/Germany reunified; migration and transnational/multilingual identities. Other media such as film, music and visual arts may also be considered.

FORMAT: Two hours of lecture and discussion and one hour of tutorial.

AP/GER 4600 3.0 Berlin in German Literature and Culture

(Taught with AP/GER 3600 3.0)

Instructor: Christina Kraenzle

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: In the last century, Berlin has undergone changes and upheavals more radical than those experienced by virtually any other great metropolis. During the first three decades of the 20th century, it was a world centre of modernism. It then served as the capital of Hitler's Third Reich. After World War II, Berlin became a microcosm of the Cold War.

The fall of the Berlin Wall and the unification of Germany began a new and challenging era for Berlin, now the capital of a "New Germany." This course highlights the following periods in the story of modern Berlin: the making of a metropolis; Weimar; Hitler and the aftermath; the Cold War; and reunification. In particular, it will consider Berlin's rich cultural history and the artists, filmmakers, writers, architects, intellectuals and other cultural agents who influenced, and were influenced by, the developments of modern Berlin.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 4640 3.0 Women in German Literature and Culture

(Taught with AP/GER 3640 3.0)

Instructor: Susan Ingram

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course will explore the rich cultural history of women writers, filmmakers and artists from German-speaking Europe, their roles and identities, and the formation of gender-specific national and intercultural models in literary works and other forms of cultural representation. We will encounter Europe's first female playwright, the winner of the 2004 Nobel Prize for Literature, and one of the 21st century's brightest young literary stars.

We will apply various theoretical and critical approaches, ranging from feminist theory, feminist or other literary criticism and social and literary history, in order to establish the historical, sociological and cultural conditions under which these texts were produced and to discuss the particular pressures and concerns to which they represent a response.

FORMAT: Three contact hours a week.

AP/GER 4725 6.0 Reading Bildung: The German Language Humanities Tradition

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 4725 6.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: The course teaches students with little or no knowledge of German how to approach key writers of the German tradition (Kant, the Brothers Grimm, Marx, Freud, Benjamin and Adorno) in the original. There will be a WebCT component to the course, which will facilitate course management as well as the distribution and collection of reading materials and assignments.

FORMAT: Three class hours per week.

AP/GER 4750 3.0 Inventing the Museum: Collecting, Culture and Modernity

Instructor: Susan Ingram

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: The course investigates how the 19th-century's creation of the public museum reinvents the story of civilization, profoundly altering concepts of memory, art, politics, history and identity. It approaches these issues in the European context, using architecture, art history, politics, history, philosophy and literature from the French Revolution to the present. The course offers theoretical perspectives by Foucault, Adorno, Benjamin, and Malraux; major literary texts by the likes of Goethe, Balzac, Stifter, Flaubert, Rilke, and Sebald; and art and architecture by figures such as Schinkel, Rodin, and Gehry. The course will additionally introduce methods for using primary sources in research and examine the notion of museum studies as a paradigm for contemporary interdisciplinary approaches to culture.

COURSE CREDIT EXCLUSION: AP/GER 4750 3.0

FORMAT: Three class hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 4751 3.0 Utopias and Nightmares: Visions of the Future in Modern German Culture

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 4884 3.0 and taught with AP/GER 3751 3.0)

NO PRERQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course examines a selection of German films and texts that serve as vehicles for assessing the current state of the world and alternatives to it. The course will examine literary and cinematic mediations of science and technology in shaping those alternatives. The course uses a cultural studies approach and further develops students' understanding of different modes of representation and text production, and of the relationship between e.g. popular, scientific, and ethical discourses on cultural production.

FORMAT: Three hours per week for one term.

AP/GER 4820 3.0 Germany in Transit: Nation, Migration and Cultural Production

(Cross-listed with AP/HUMA 4883 3.0 and taught with AP/GER 3820 3.0)

NO PREREQUISITE.

DESCRIPTION: This course considers how concepts of national community and belonging based on ancestral lineage and cultural heritage have been challenged in the wake of increased migration. Using Germany as a case study, we will explore how contemporary artists are exploring issues of national and cultural identity, citizenship and minority rights. We will also consider the aesthetic practices they employ to inscribe novel configurations of place, language and identity. Our discussions and analyses will touch on major topics such as mobility and identity; gender and migration, language and identity; place and belonging; racism and xenophobia. We will consider a variety of media including film and visual arts, literature and music.

FORMAT: Three hours per week for one term.

Note: All of German upper-level culture courses are cross-listed with either the Humanities or English programs. Students who enrol in theses course through the German Section of the Department of Languages, Literatures and Linguistics, the courses fulfil requirements of German Studies majors and minors in the German Language, Literature and Culture Stream. These students read some of the German-language works in the original and write some assignments in German. For students who enrol in these courses through the Humanities or English, the courses fulfil requirements of the German Culture and Society Stream of German Studies. In these cases, no knowledge of German is required. The major texts are available in a bilingual version.